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“When you’re alone as a kid, the monsters see you as weaker;
You don’t even know they’re getting closer until it’s too late!”

Terror came in many forms this year. When it comes out from Stephen King’s prolific mind, it never loses its string to terrify all. As everyone has a kid inside them, fear rises hurriedly when it meets one’s fantasy of childhood scares. Once you start drowning in the lake of fear, evil can easily pick you up like fishing. “It” has a similar taste of this theory. Based on Stephen King’s 1986 novel, this film about supernatural clown terror is seamlessly frightening with an impressive charm at its center.




It took 27 years for Pennywise (dancing clown) to come back on big screen from the 1990’s horror mini-series. Derry (fictional town) has curfew again after 7 PM due to the mysterious events of missing children. Here, we have a losers’ club including Bill, Ben, Mike, Eddie, Stanley and Beverly. Each one has their different fantasies about fear. Pennywise builds the wired conspiracy to divide them by fear so that he can hunt them. Will unity of losers’ club able to heal the strategy of Pennywise or not? “It” holds answer for that.

Bill Skarsgård as Pennywise steals the show. His fairly well acting gives the unnerving aroma to the film. Instead of making an audience nervous for the short time scares, the roles played by younger cast deliver the fun and dramatic touch. There are so many reasons for the film of being R-rated. Hopefully, it is good. Because, “It” has some really intense and intriguing sequences which could not be justified without R-rating. It has multiple jump scares but even more than that “It” has a salutary story to bind you up to its run-time.




Andy Muschietti who has previously impressed us with his debut horror flick “Mama” directed the film beautifully. Music have always been the strong contestant to light up the horror show and Benjamin Wallfisch’s background score is a winner for “It”. The film’s only deficiency remains in its inability to render life to the novel perfectly. But, “It” justifies the novel astoundingly.

“It” proves the legendary writing skills of Stephen King in creating dark characters. Reliving the childhood horror back on screen, “It” manages not to be too childish at any point. Moreover, the film grabs the viewer’s attention from start to finish. It truly frightens you by its humorous jump scares on well adapted story. The climax opens the door for the next chapter which increases the hype among its viewers. Despite of having some disturbing sequences, “It” is a merriment and satisfying experience.

★★★★

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