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15 Must See Coming Of Age Films Of 2015

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7. Tu Dors Nicole | Director:  Stéphane Lafleur

coming of age 11

Lafleur’s film is slight and striking. The monochrome helps the viewer to focus on the sense of the things that go around the mainframe. It basically follows Nicole through her various labors of tired, endless, sleepless montages. Its surrealistic dream-like realism makes way for a whale like a burden on you. The protagonist feels like she is trapped in a summer that lasts forever and her eyes that just wouldn’t shut up for a second of frustrated relief.




6. Dope | Director: Rick Famuyiwa

coming of age 12

A woozy, energetic and hilarious comedy about the geeks who go gangsta on the world. Lased with the dopest soundtrack & a razor-sharp screenplay, Dope chronicles the life of Malcolm (Shameik Moore) a 90s hip-hop geek who rides BMX bikes & has a band whose name rhymes with a popular biscuit. Watch his life give him a topsy-turvy as he understands that not being able to fit in is essentially a blessing in disguise.




5. The Tribe | Director: Miroslav Slaboshpitsky

https://i1.wp.com/vaguevisages.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/the-tribe-seven.jpg?ssl=1

Love and hate need no translation. So does Miroslav Slaboshpitsky’s film. There are no words spoken and there are no subtitles for the ones that are conveyed through gestures. And yet the film is so powerful in places that it feels you can’t close your ears hearing someone hammer a piece of Iron for eternity. The Tribe is a horrific look into the life of a kid who gets sucked into a world of violence and patriarchy. It is one of those brutally violent films that traces its footsteps right up to the credits and shuts the door on your face.

Also, Read THE TRIBE [2015]: LOVE & HATRED DON’T NEED TRANSLATION




4. Killa | Director: Avinash Arun

coming of age 13

Killa (The Fort) is a nostalgic trip down memory lane. It accounts the life of Chinmay (Archit Deodhar) whose mother has been recently transferred to a village in Konkan.  The film takes us through thick and thin as Chinmay has to learn to accept that things wouldn’t go the way he plans and that adjusting to the situations is the most necessary step he can take. Avinash Arun‘s film is beautifully shot and it manages to capture the innocence and emotion of the young one in exact implications.




3. Mistress America | Director: Noah Baumbach

coming of age 14

Another incredibly charming, fast-paced oddball comedy about people who are surrounded by failure. It’s interesting how Noah manages to show the failing nature of his characters in such a subtle manner. While Mistress America is mostly about Brooke (Greta Gerwig) whose ambitions and authenticity get muddled up in the disorienting world of New York City, it was also about Tracy (Lola Kirk) who never seems to stop to look around at the various things she is failing at. Its a retrospective on the life of two women trying their best to grasp upon the moving land, learning to accept and understand each other and themselves in the process.




2. Titli | Director: Kanu Behl.

coming of age 15

An unsettling, disturbing & absolutely devastating film about the dog-eat-dog world. Aching its premise to the underbellies of Delhi, Titli was about escapism from a series of self-confused muddled relationships leading the disarranged self to the extremes. It was about selfish dreams & about the pigs who just want to stay in the dirt, leading the other baby pigs on the same scribbled pathway.  A coming-of-age film about a butterfly fluttering its wings in the raw dust that hails the survival of the fittest. 

Also, Read – TITLI [2015]: A TERRIFYING INVESTIGATION OF THE DOG-EAT-DOG WORLD




1. Breathe | Director: Mélanie Laurent.

coming of age 16

Breathe works on all fronts. It’s a psychological drama that outweighs its contents. There are glimmers of identity crises, depression, jealousy, isolation & crippled physical & mental trauma.  While it glides unflinchingly through its running length it keeps you engrossed in the excellent compositions of carefully knitted scenes. Breathe has a rather evil approach to some of its most tender emotional conflicts, leaving no space for it to sound overly profound. Hence, making it equally impact full. 

Also, Read – Breathe [2015]: A DEVASTATING INSPECTION OF EMOTIONAL TURMOIL!




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Recommended Read : Anatomy of Lynch , Top 20 Criminally Under-rated films of 2015 , Top 10 Hindi Films , The 15 Best Indian Films of 2015.

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